Happy Thanksgiving

Happy Thanksgiving

Swing City Radio wishes you a Happy Thanksgiving!  We are so thankful for all of you that have been listening to the station for the last couple months.  If you like what you are hearing, then please let your friends and family know. 

Swing City Radio: Playing Your Big Band and Swing Music Favorites from the 1930's, 40's and Today! - Big Band Radio Station Broadcasting Online from King of Prussia, PA.

Christmas Music

Big Band and Swing Christmas Music

Starting on Thanksgiving Day, Swing City Radio will be playing Christmas songs by your favorite Big Band and Swing artists along with some other Christmas standards.  We will be scattering them in throughout the day mixed in with our normal programming.  (About one or two songs per hour.)

We will also be featuring some Christmas songs from some new, unsigned Big Band artists that we are very excited about.  I plan on featuring some articles about them so you can learn more about the artists and their music.

I'll keep you posted about any plans we may have for Christmas Day and New Years Eve.

I hope you all enjoy your Thanksgiving and thanks for continuing to listen and supporting the station.  Maybe you can have the station playing in the background as you have your Thanksgiving dinner?  It's my understanding that Big Band and Swing music helps the body digest food better.  Just kidding! :)

Enjoy the holiday and be safe!

Swing City Radio: Playing Your Big Band and Swing Music Favorites from the 1930's, 40's and Today! - Big Band Radio Station Broadcasting Online from King of Prussia, PA.

Earl Burtnett

Earl Burtnett

Earl Burtnett (1896–1936) was a bandleader, songwriter and pianist.  Burtlett was popular in the 1920's and 1930's.

In 1918 he joined Art Hickman's band as lead arranger and writer for the orchestra.  He penned some successful songs for Hickman including "Sleep", "Leave Me With A Smile", "Mandalay", and "If I Should Lose You".

In 1929, he took over as band leader on Hickman's retirement. His band then had a residency at the Biltmore Hotel in Los Angeles, and recorded for Brunswick Records backing the Biltmore Trio. They played across the country in the early and mid 1930's, with periods at both the Rice Hotel in Houston, and later at the Drake Hotel and other venues in Chicago, where their concerts were often broadcast on WGN radio.

Burtnett recorded for Columbia from 1926 through 1928 when he signed with Brunswick again and recorded prolifically through mid-1931.

On Christmas Eve, 1935, Burtnett underwent an emergency appendectomy in Chicago. However, peritonitis set in after the operation, and he died on January 2, 1936 at the age of 39.  He unfortunately passed away right as swing music was starting to take hold in the United States.  One can only imagine the great music he would have created.

You can hear Earl Burtnett right here on Swing City Radio.

Swing City Radio: Playing Your Big Band and Swing Music Favorites from the 1930's, 40's and Today! - Big Band Radio Station Broadcasting Online from King of Prussia, PA.

Don Redman

Don Redman

Don Redman (1900 – 1964) was a talented musician of many instruments, as well as an innovative arranger, bandleader, and composer.

Redman was born in West Virginia. His father was a music teacher and his mother was a singer. Don began playing the trumpet at the age of three and joined his first band at the age of six. Think about that! Six years old and in a band! By the age of 12, Redman was proficient on all wind instruments ranging from trumpet to oboe as well and could even play piano.

In 1923, Redman joined the Fletcher Henderson orchestra, mostly playing clarinet and saxophones.  With Fletcher Henderson's band he began writing arrangements. Redman was very influential in establishing the sound that was to become swing.

In 1927, he joined McKinney's Cotton Pickers as their musical director and leader. He was responsible for their great success and arranged over half of their music selection.

Redman then formed the Don Redman Orchestra in 1931. They got a residency at the famous Manhattan jazz club Connie's Inn.  That year Redman also signed with Brunswick Records. The Brunswick records Redman made between 1931–1934 were some of the most complex pre-swing hot jazz arrangements of popular tunes.

The band hopped from label to label until 1940 when Redman disbanded the orchestra.  At that point in his career he concentrated on freelance work writing arrangements. Some of his arrangements became hits for Jimmy Dorsey, Count Basie, and Harry James. In the 1950's he was the music director for singer Pearl Bailey.

You can hear Don Redman right here on Swing City Radio.

Swing City Radio: Playing Your Big Band and Swing Music Favorites from the 1930's, 40's and Today! - Big Band Radio Station Broadcasting Online from King of Prussia, PA.

Bunny Berigan

Bunny Berigan

Bunny Berigan (1908–1942) was a trumpeter and bandleader whose career was tragically cut short by alcoholism.

Berigan started his career playing with local bands as a teenager in his home state of Wisconsin. He joined Hal Kemp's Orchestra in 1929 after failing his first tryout for the band.  By late 1930 he had already become a sought out studio musician providing trumpet solos for Abe Lyman, Paul Whiteman and Benny Goodman.  From late 1932 through early 1934, Berigan was a member of Paul Whiteman's orchestra, before playing with Abe Lyman's band for a bit in 1934.

In 1934, Bunny returned to freelancing and recorded as a sideman on hundreds of recordings, most notably with the Dorsey Brothers and Glenn Miller's earliest recordings as a band leader.

At the same time, Berigan joined Benny Goodman's Swing band. With Berigan and Gene Krupa both on board, the Goodman band made the tour that ended at the Palomar Ballroom in Los Angeles. That tour and performance are often credited with the launch of the swing era.  Berigan recorded a number of solos while with Benny Goodman, including "King Porter Stomp", "Sometimes I'm Happy", and "Blue Skies".

Berigan led his own band full-time from early 1937 until June 1942, with a six-month hiatus in 1940 as a sideman in Tommy Dorsey's band. Berigan's alcoholism worked against his financial success as a bandleader. The stresses of bandleading drove Berigan to drink even more heavily. Some of the notable members of his band were Buddy Rich, Ray Conniff and Les Elgart.

Berigan sadly passed away in 1942 of cirrhosis of the liver.

You can hear Bunny Berigan right here on Swing City Radio.

Swing City Radio: Playing Your Big Band and Swing Music Favorites from the 1930's, 40's and Today! - Big Band Radio Station Broadcasting Online from King of Prussia, PA.

Cootie Williams

Cootie Williams

Cootie Williams (1911–1985) was a highly gifted trumpeter and band leader.

Cootie Williams began his professional career at the young age of fourteen with the Young Family band, which also happened to include Lester Young on sax. Williams once said he acquired his nickname as a boy when his father took him to a band concert. When it was over his father asked him what he'd heard and the young William replied, "Cootie, cootie, cootie."  Makes me wonder what band his father took him to see. :)

In 1928, he worked briefly in the bands of both Chick Webb and Fletcher Henderson.  His career took off when he became a member of Duke Ellington's orchestra when the band was playing at the Cotton Club. He also recorded his own sessions during this time, both as a freelancer and with other members Ellington's band. Williams was renowned for his "jungle" style of trumpet playing and for his use of the plunger mute. He would also sing occasionally. He was the soloist in major Ellington compositions like "Echoes of Harlem" and "Harlem Air Shaft."

In 1940 he joined Benny Goodman's orchestra. It was a highly publicized move within the Big Band community and it's fans. and it caused quite a stir at the time.  Then in 1941, Cootie Williams formed his own orchestra.  Some of the musicians he employed over the years were Charlie Parker, Eddie Davis, Bud Powell and Eddie Vinson.

In the late 1940's the band disbanded and Cootie began to focus more on rhythm and blues music.

You can listen to Cootie Williams and His Orchestra right here on Swing City Radio.

Swing City Radio: Playing Your Big Band and Swing Music Favorites from the 1930's, 40's and Today! - Big Band Radio Station Broadcasting Online from King of Prussia, PA.

Dolly Dawn

Dolly Dawn

Dolly Dawn (1916–2002) was a vocalist and band leader. She was a singer with George Hall's Hotel Taft Orchestra in the 1930's and later took over control of the band.

In the early 1930's she appeared weekly on a local radio show based in New Jersey where she grew up. In 1935 she replaced Loretta Lee as vocalist with George Hall's orchestra.  She and the band broadcast six days a week from the famous Grill Room of the Taft Hotel in New York. The band became very popular. Her most successful song with George Hall's Hotel Taft Orchestra was "You're a Sweetheart."

In July of 1941 George Hall officially turned the band over to Dolly and became her manager. The band was renamed "Dolly Dawn and Her Dawn Patrol".  This was short-lived because she lost many member of the band because of the World War II draft. From 1942 she continued on without the band appearing in clubs, dance halls and in other engagements throughout the US.

Dolly continued to record as a solo artist into the 1950's.

You can hear Dolly Dawn and Her Dawn Patrol as well as George Hall's Hotel Taft Orchestra right here on Swing City Radio.

Swing City Radio: Playing Your Big Band and Swing Music Favorites from the 1930's, 40's and Today! - Big Band Radio Station Broadcasting Online from King of Prussia, PA.

Raymond Scott

Raymond Scott

Raymond Scott (1908–1994) was an composer, band leader, pianist, record producer, and inventor of many electronic instruments.

Scott never scored cartoon soundtracks, but his music is familiar to millions because Carl Stalling adapted it in over 120 Bugs Bunny, Porky Pig, Daffy Duck, and other Warner Bros. Looney Tunes and other cartoons.  Just try to listen to Scott's music and not have visions of famous cartoon scenes that you may remember from your childhood. :)

Scott began his professional career as a pianist for the CBS Radio house band with his older brother. In late 1936, Raymond Scott put together a band with some of his CBS colleagues, calling it the Raymond Scott Quintette. It was a six-piece group, but he thought "Quintette" (an original spelling created by him) sounded "crisper". The band included Pete Pumiglio on clarinet, Bunny Berigan on trumpet (Later replaced by Dave Wade), Louis Shoobe on double bass, Dave Harris playing tenor saxophone and Johnny Williams on drums. They made their first recordings in 1937 for Master Records.

The Quintette represented Scott's vision of breathing new life into swing music through tight, busy arrangements and riffs that reduced improvisation. Scott called this style "descriptive jazz." He is also known for his unique and unusual song titles like "New Year's Eve in a Haunted House", "Dinner Music for a Pack of Hungry Cannibals" and "Bumpy Weather Over Newark".

Scott believed in composing and playing by ear. He didn't composed on paper at all.  The Quintette's songs derived from Scott humming phrases to his sidemen or by playing riffs and rhythms on his keyboard and letting the band members interpret his cues. It was all done by ear with no written scores. Scott, who was also a very creative sound engineer, recorded the band's rehearsals on discs and used the recordings as references to develop his compositions. He reworked, re-sequenced, and deleted passages, and added themes from other discs to construct the final songs. While creating a song, he let his group members improvise, but once the song had been completed, he regarded the song as "locked" and and "as is". This was a VERY different approach at that time.

The Quintette existed from 1937 to 1939 and recorded the popular "Twilight in Turkey", "Minuet in Jazz", "War Dance for Wooden Indians", "Reckless Night on Board an Ocean Liner", "Powerhouse", and "The Penguin."

You can hear many of Raymond Scott's recordings right here on Swing City Radio.

Swing City Radio: Playing Your Big Band and Swing Music Favorites from the 1930's, 40's and Today! - Big Band Radio Station Broadcasting Online from King of Prussia, PA.

The Sunday Morning Swing


So how do you spend your Sunday mornings?  Do lounge around in pajamas sipping a delicious cup of coffee?  Maybe it's the one time in the week where you can sit down and have a relaxing breakfast with your family or spend some peaceful moments before going to church.

We all spend our precious Sunday Mornings in different ways.  Consider making The Sunday Morning Swing a new part of your routine.  Ease through your morning with the relaxing, smooth sounds of the Big Bands.  The Sunday Morning Swing features the softer Big Band favorites from the 1930's and 40's.  Let's make Big Band Music on Sunday mornings a tradition.  The show is even better with a great cup of coffee.

By the way, I like my coffee strong and bold.  No cream or sugar for this guy.  :)

Listen every Sunday Morning from 8am EST to 11am EST.

Swing City Radio: Playing Your Big Band and Swing Music Favorites from the 1930's, 40's and Today! - Big Band Radio Station Broadcasting Online from King of Prussia, PA.

Vaughn Monroe

Vaughn Monroe

Vaughn Monroe (1911–1973) was a singer, trumpeter and band leader. He rose to popularity in the 1940's and maintained that popularity throughout the 1950's.

In 1940, Monroe formed his first band in Boston and became its main singer. He was signed to the Bluebird label of RCA Victor.

Monroe recorded extensively until 1956, and his signature tune was "Racing With the Moon". It sold more than one million copies and Monroe was awarded a gold disc by the RIAA.  Among his other hits were "In the Still of the Night", "There I Go", "There I've Said It Again", "Let It Snow, Let It Snow, Let It Snow", "Ballerina", "Melody Time" and "Riders in the Sky."

Monroe's orchestra had a number of excellent musicians. They focused mainly on romantic ballads in the studio, these songs became the hits for them.  When live, the band had a fiercely swinging side only occasionally captured on record. In ballrooms, Monroe often reserved the final set of the evening for unrestrained, swinging music.  I need to find some of those sets and put them on the air.

Listen to Vaughn Monroe and His Orchestra on Swing City Radio.

Swing City Radio: Playing Your Big Band and Swing Music Favorites from the 1930's, 40's and Today! - Big Band Radio Station Broadcasting Online from King of Prussia, PA.

Erskine Hawkins

Erskine Hawkins

Erskine Hawkins (1914–1993) was a trumpeter, band leader and composer from Birmingham, Alabama. He is most remembered for composing the song "Tuxedo Junction" with saxophonist Bill Johnson. The song became a huge hit during World War II. Erskine's version made it as high as No. 7 on the national charts while Glenn Miller's version became a #1 Hit Song.

During 1936 through 1938, he recorded for Vocalion Records as "Erskine Hawkins and his 'Bama State Collegians". He later signed with RCA Victor Records and began recording on their Bluebird label as "Erskine Hawkins and His Orchestra".

In the late 1930s Erskine Hawkins and His Orchestra were one of the house bands at the Savoy Ballroom. They alternated with Chick Webb's band. They often used Tuxedo Junction as their sign-off song before the next band would take the stage.  Hawkins also engaged in battles of the bands with such bandleaders as Glenn Miller, Duke Ellington, and Lionel Hampton.

In the mid 1940's, he was transferred to the main RCA Victor label, recording many of his greatest hits for both labels during the 40's.

Listen to Erskine Hawkins right here on Swing City Radio.

Swing City Radio: Playing Your Big Band and Swing Music Favorites from the 1930's, 40's and Today! - Big Band Radio Station Broadcasting Online from King of Prussia, PA.

Veterans: Thank You

Veteran's Day

Our flag does not fly because the wind moves it… it flies with the last breath of each soldier who died protecting it.

Swing City Radio thanks the American Veterans who have helped keep this incredible country free.



Swing Street Box Set

Swing Street Album Cover

I was out again this weekend searching the used record stores. As I was digging deep in a dusty ol' corner of one of the stores and I found this gem.  "Swing Street" is a 4 LP compilation of some great music.  The set was originally released in 1962.  I'm really looking forward to digitizing these LP's and getting them up on the station for your enjoyment.

You can look forward to hearing tracks from Eddie Condon And His Orchestra, Wingy Manone And His Orchestra, Red Allen, Louis Prima, John Kirby, Mildred Bailey and many, many more.

The artwork on the cover is fantastic and the booklet inside looks like it's filled with some great info.  (Haven't read it yet.  Just scanned through.)

Swing City Radio: Playing Your Big Band and Swing Music Favorites from the 1930's, 40's and Today! - Big Band Radio Station Broadcasting Online from King of Prussia, PA.

Larry Clinton

Larry Clinton

Larry Clinton (1909-1985) was best known as a trumpeter who became a prominent American bandleader and arranger.

While in his twenties, Larry Clinton became a prolific arranger for some of the bigger bandleaders at the time. Tommy Dorsey, Jimmy Dorsey, Glen Gray, Louis Armstrong, and Bunny Berigan all used Larry Clinton charts and arrangements.

His first crack at being a bandleader was from 1937 to 1941.  Larry recorded a string of hits for Victor Records. The Clinton band's repertoire was a mix of pop tunes of the day, instrumentals written by Clinton, and swing versions of classical music compositions. The last category swept the industry, and orchestras everywhere were "swinging the classics" by adding pop lyrics to melodies by Debussy, Tchaikovsky and other classical composers. His version of Debussy's "Reverie", with vocalist Bea Wain, was particularly popular.  His version of "My Reverie" peaked at #1 on Billboard in 1938.

In 1941 Clinton and his band appeared in six short musical films which eventually became "Soundies." This was one of his last jobs as a bandleader; he temporarily quit the music business upon the outbreak of World War II, and joined the United States Army Air Forces. A rated pilot, he rose to the rank of captain, was stationed in Calcutta and China and was a flight instructor with the 1343rd Base Unit.

After returning home from service, he resumed his musical career and enjoyed further success as a bandleader from 1948 to 1950.

You can hear many of Larry Clinton's songs on Swing City Radio.

Swing City Radio: Playing Your Big Band and Swing Music Favorites from the 1930's, 40's and Today! - Big Band Radio Station Broadcasting Online from King of Prussia, PA.

Big Bad Voodoo Daddy

Big Bad Voodoo Daddy

Big Bad Voodoo Daddy is considered a swing revival band from Southern California. Their biggest singles include "Go Daddy-O", "You and Me and the Bottle Makes 3 Tonight (Baby)", and "Mr. Pinstripe Suit".

After playing in punk and alternative rock bands during the 1980's, Scotty Morris founded Big Bad Voodoo Daddy with Kurt Sodergren in Ventura, California.

So how did they pick the name Big Bad Voodoo Daddy?  Well, the story is that Scotty Morris met blues guitar legend Albert Collins after one of Collins' concerts. Scotty Morris, being a big Albert Collins fan asked Albert to sign a poster he had brought with him. "He signed my poster 'To Scotty, the big bad voodoo daddy'," Morris explains. "I thought it was the coolest name I ever heard on one of the coolest musical nights I ever had. So when it came time to name this band, I didn't really have a choice. I felt like it was handed down to me."

The band has concentrated on the swing of the 1940's and 1950's, playing clubs and lounges in their early years.

The band launched two CDs, Big Bad Voodoo Daddy and Watchu' Want for Christmas? under their own label before getting their big break when their songs "You and Me and the Bottle Makes 3 Tonight (Baby)", "I Wan'na Be Like You" and "Go Daddy-O" were featured in the soundtrack of the 1996 comedy-drama Swingers.

At that point, they were signed by Interscope Records. While with Interscope, the band released Americana Deluxe, This Beautiful Life, and Save My Soul. The band has continued their tours, performances and album releases.  Thanks for continuing to carry the torch of Swing guys!

You can hear Big Bad Voodoo Daddy right here on Swing City Radio.

Swing City Radio: Playing Your Big Band and Swing Music Favorites from the 1930's, 40's and Today! - Big Band Radio Station Broadcasting Online from King of Prussia, PA.

Dinah Shore

Dinah Shore

Dinah Shore (1916–1994) was an American singer, actress and television personality, and the top-charting female vocalist of the 1940's. She rose to prominence as a recording artist during the Big Band era. I have to say, Dinah was a HUGE artist during the era, but history seems to remember Doris Day and Patti Page more, maybe because they were so similar stylistically. She eventually moved on to television and achieved even greater success a decade later.

Her music career started off bumpy, after failing singing auditions for the bands of Benny Goodman, and both Dorsey brothers, Shore struck out on her own. She became the first singer of her era to achieve huge solo success. She had a string of 80 charted popular hits, spanning 1940–1957.

One of her most popular recordings was the holiday perennial "Baby, It's Cold Outside" with Buddy Clark. The song was covered by many other artists, such as Ella Fitzgerald. Other hits included "Laughing on the Outside (Crying on the Inside)", "I Wish I Didn't Love You So", "I Love You (For Sentimental Reasons)", "Doin' What Comes Naturally", and "Dear Hearts and Gentle People".

During World War II, Shore participated in USO tours to Europe. She appeared in person, on radio, and on record with a number of British and American stars, including Major Glenn Miller and his large Army Air Force Band.

After appearing in a handful of feature films, she went on to a four-decade career in American television.  I remember watching her shows with my Pop Pop. I was too young to recall any details, but I know he was a fan of her.  Or maybe it was because there was only a handful of channels back then so you just watched what was on.  Regardless, I have memories of her on the tube.  :)

TV Guide ranked her at number 16 on their list of the top 50 television stars of all time.

Listen to Swing City Radio to hear many of Dinah Shore's songs.

Swing City Radio: Playing Your Big Band and Swing Music Favorites from the 1930's, 40's and Today! - Big Band Radio Station Broadcasting Online from King of Prussia, PA.

Benny Goodman: The Golden Age of Swing

Picture of Benny Goodman: The Golden Age of Swing

So as you can imagine, I spend a lot of time digging through the used record stores looking for great Big Band and Swing music to play on the station.  I found a great Benny Goodman collection during the summer entitled "The Golden Age of Swing."  I know, I know, it's November as I'm writing this and I just admitted I bought this in the summer.  Let's just say I was busy getting the radio station set up for all of you in radio land.

As I was working on the website today I decided to put this on the turntable and give it a spin, and WOW!, what a great recording.  This 5 record set was released in 1956 and claims to be a limited edition.  The collection captures Benny's career up until that date and features songs by Benny Goodman and his Orchestra, his Trio and his Quartet.

I was lucky enough to find this in fantastic condition and if I remember correctly, spent only $2 for it.  The cover and booklet show very little wear and tear, the vinyl is clear and looks and sounds like it was barely played.  I'm sure I'll be digitizing many of these tracks soon so you all can get a listen.

Picture of The Golden Age of Swing Booklet

Swing City Radio: Playing Your Big Band and Swing Music Favorites from the 1930's, 40's and Today! - Big Band Radio Station Broadcasting Online from King of Prussia, PA.

Buddy Clark

Buddy Clark


Buddy Clark (1912 – 1949) was a popular singer of the 1930s and 1940s. In the late 1940s, after returning from service in World War II, his career blossomed and he became one of the nation's top crooners. His life and career were cut short due to a tragic plane crash.

He made his Big Band singing debut in 1932, with Gus Arnheim's orchestra, but was not successful. He gained wider notice in 1934, with Benny Goodman on the Let's Dance radio program. In 1936 he began performing on the show Your Hit Parade, and remained until 1938. In the mid-1930s he signed with Vocalion Records, having a top-20 hit with "Spring Is Here". He continued recording until he entered the military, but did not have another hit until the late 1940s.

In 1946, after returning from World War II, he signed with Columbia Records and scored his biggest hit with the song "Linda."

Interesting little fact:
Now here is something I didn't know until making this post. "Linda" was written especially for the six-year-old daughter of a show business lawyer named Lee Eastman, whose client, songwriter Jack Lawrence, wrote the song at Lee’s request. When she reached adulthood, Linda became Linda McCartney. She was famous as a photographer, a musician (as a member of Wings), and a spokeswoman for animal rights.

Getting back to Buddy Clark, 1947 also saw hits for Clark with such titles as "How Are Things in Glocca Morra?, "Peg O' My Heart", "An Apple Blossom Wedding", and "I'll Dance at Your Wedding". The following year he had another major hit with "Love Somebody."

On Saturday, October 1, 1949, hours after Buddy had completed a broadcast on CBS Radio with The Andrews Sisters, Clark joined five friends in renting a small plane to attend a college football game in Stanford, California. On the way back to Los Angeles after the game, the plane ran out of fuel, lost altitude, and crashed on Beverly Boulevard in West Los Angeles. Clark didn't survive the crash.  A month after his death, his recording of "A Dreamer's Holiday" hit the charts.

You can hear many of Buddy Clark's songs right here on Swing City Radio.

Swing City Radio: Playing Your Big Band and Swing Music Favorites from the 1930's, 40's and Today! - Big Band Radio Station Broadcasting Online from King of Prussia, PA.

Andy Kirk

Andy Kirk and His Twelve Clouds of Joy

Andy Kirk (1898 – 1992) was a jazz saxophonist and bandleader who led the Twelve Clouds of Joy, a band popular during the swing era.

Kirk grew up in Denver, Colorado, where he was tutored by Wilberforce Whiteman, Paul Whiteman's father.  We play many of Paul Whiteman's tunes on Swing City Radio as well.  Kirk started his musical career playing with George Morrison's band, but then went on to join Terrence Holder's Dark Clouds of Joy. In 1929 he was elected leader after Holder left for personal reasons.

Renaming the band Clouds of Joy, Kirk also relocated the band from Dallas to Kansas City. Although named the Clouds of Joy, the band has also been known as the Twelve Clouds of Joy due to the number of musicians in the band.

After Kirk moved the band to Kansas City they grew popular as they epitomized the Kansas City jazz sound. In mid-1936, he was signed to Decca and made scores of popular records until 1946.

Listen to Andy Kirk and His Twelve Clouds of Joy right here on Swing City Radio.

Swing City Radio: Playing Your Big Band and Swing Music Favorites from the 1930's, 40's and Today! - Big Band Radio Station Broadcasting Online from King of Prussia, PA.

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